Agenda

 

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  • Monday, November 18, 2019
  •  
    12:00 PM  -  1:00 PM
    Workshop Registration and Check-in
    Grand Registration
     Optional 
     

    Sessions

    1:00 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Critical Infrastructure Workshop
    The objective of the CyCON US 2019 Critical Infrastructure workshop focuses on the Army Cyber Institute’s Jack Voltaic Critical Infrastructure Research series. Jack Voltaic 2.0 was an innovative, bottom-up approach to critical infrastructure resilience. Executed 24-26 July, 2018 and hosted by the City of Houston in partnership with AECOM and Circadence, the project assembled critical infrastructure partners to study unidentified gaps in response to cyber-attacks against its critical infrastructure. The Jack Voltaic 2.5 Cyber Workshops sought to build and enhance our understanding of existing cybersecurity capabilities as well as protection gaps in DoD critical infrastructure security and community resilience. The focus of these workshops were communities that directly support DoD's force projection mission and included participation from DoD critical infrastructure owners along with co-located mayors and city emergency management leads. This workshop will follow a similar structure as the 2.5 Cyber Workshops. It will provide a background of the Jack Voltaic series of research events, followed by a mini-scenario that encourages participant discussion and feedback. Finally, the workshop will cover the findings and recommendations of Jack Voltaic 2.0, share insights and findings from the series of Jack Voltaic 2.5 workshops, and provide information on Jack Voltaic 3.0.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    General

    5:00 PM  -  8:00 PM
    Registration and Check-in  (Check-in)
    Grand Registration
  • Tuesday, November 19, 2019
  •  

    Break

    7:30 AM  -  8:45 AM
    Registration Check-in & Networking Coffee
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    General

    8:45 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Conference Admin Remarks  (Intro)
    Grand Ballroom
     

    Keynote

    9:00 AM  -  9:30 AM
    Opening Remarks
    Grand Ballroom
    Hosts:
    9:30 AM  -  10:00 AM
    Keynote Address: Mr. David Luber (USCYBERCOM)
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
    10:00 AM  -  10:15 AM
    Keynote Address: COL Jaak Tarien
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
    10:15 AM  -  10:50 AM
    Keynote Address: Command Sergeant Major William M. Rinehart ARSOUTH
    Grand Ballroom
    A fireside chat discussion on how partner nations who are not at the defensive level of the USA can contribute to the defending forward concept.
    Keynote Speaker:
    Speakers:
     

    Break

    10:50 AM  -  11:20 AM
    Networking Break
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    Keynote

    11:20 AM  -  11:55 AM
    Keynote Address: Fireside Chat with Heather McMahon
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
    11:55 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Keynote Address: The Honorable Mike Rogers
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
     

    Meals

    12:30 PM  -  1:30 PM
    Conference Lunch
    Grand Foyer A-C
    Included conference buffet lunch
     

    Sessions

    1:30 PM  -  2:45 PM
    Panel Session: Operational Cyber Law Of, By, and For Practitioners
    Salon H
    This panel examines ongoing and future cyber operations from an operational law perspective. Cyber operations intersect with the law on many high visibility fronts, in such areas as sovereignty, attribution, deception, and the Law of War. This panel will feature the military law practitioners who engage these issues on a daily basis and who advise cyber decision makers at the operational level. Panelists will discuss current State practice—including the “defending forward” approach—from a legal perspective, evaluating the efficacy of ongoing efforts to mitigate threats and ultimately seeking to predict which operational issues will challenge practitioners and decision makers in the future. The answers to these and many more questions on this panel will help to meaningfully shape the future of cyber conflict and its associated legal framework.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  2:45 PM
    Panel Session: The Security and Reliability of 5G for the Future
    Grand Ballroom
    With 5G technology starting to make its debut into mainstream general conversation, a lot of focus is on how 5G can increase our access to the internet, facilitate smart environments, and provide better coverage than its predecessors. Before 5G technology can be implemented into everyday life, a lot of backend work has to be done and definitions for what 5G actually is still needs to be finalized. In the specifications for 5G technology, there are numerous security requirements and improvements to prior generations. A lot of these features rely on how each company implements the technology into their current infrastructure. The panel will discuss topics ranging from the current state of affairs to the architecture of 5G technology. An emphasis will be on how the technology will be integrated into the current infrastructure with respect to privacy and security, how this technology can be used to help the U.S. to defend forward, and what precautions need to be taken.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    1:30 PM  -  2:45 PM
    Paper Session 1
    Alexandria Room
    Paper presentations will be made by the following authors:
    • Dr. Jim Chen, "A Framework of Collaborative Methods"
    • Dr. Matthew Flynn, "Civilians 'Defending Forward' in Cyberspace"
    Speakers:
     Optional 
     

    Break

    2:45 PM  -  3:15 PM
    Networking Break
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    Sessions

    3:15 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Panel Session: Communications in a Satellite Denied Environment
    Grand Ballroom
    Modern militaries utilize satellites to communicate beyond the line of sight. In the event these satellites are attacked through cyber or electromagnetic means, the military must be capable of using alternate means of communication. Prior to satellite communication, the primary method for beyond the line of sight communication was high frequency (HF) radio. Understanding how to properly employ HF radio and utilize modern digital modes over HF radio is essential in a satellite denied or degraded environment. This panel will discuss challenges of employing HF radios and advances in digital modes that enhance the capabilities of HF communications.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    3:15 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Panel Session: Cost-Benefit Analysis and NIST Cybersecurity Framework
    Salon H
    The National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework has rapidly become a widely accepted approach in facilitating cybersecurity risk management within organizations. An insightful aspect of the NIST Cybersecurity Framework is its explicit recognition that the activities associated with managing cybersecurity risk are organization specific. The NIST Framework also recognizes that organizations should evaluate their cybersecurity risk management on a cost-benefit basis. The NIST Framework, however, does not provide guidance on how to carry out such a cost-benefit analysis. This paper provides an approach for integrating cost-benefit analysis into the NIST Cybersecurity Framework. The Gordon-Loeb (GL) Model (Gordon and Loeb, 2002; Gordon et al., 2016) for cybersecure ty investments is proposed as a basis for deriving a cost-effective level of spending on cybersecurity activities and selecting the appropriate NIST Implementation Tier. The analysis shows that the GL Model provides a logical approach to use when considering the cost-benefit aspects of cybersecurity investments during an organization’s process of selecting the most appropriate NIST Implementation Tier level. In addition, the cost-benefit approach provided in this paper would help to identify conditions under which there is an incentive to move to a higher NIST Implementation Tier.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    3:15 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Paper Session 2
    Alexandria Room
    Papers will be presented by the following authors:
    • Dr. Martin Libicki, "Norms and Normalization"
    • Dr. James Platte, "Defending Forward on the Korean Peninsula"
    • Dr. Max Smeets and JD Work, "Operational Decision-Making for Cyber Operations: In Search of a Model"
     Optional 
     

    Keynote

    4:35 PM  -  5:05 PM
    Keynote Address: LTG(R) Robert Schmidle
    Grand Ballroom
    Panelists:
  • Wednesday, November 20, 2019
  •  

    Break

    7:30 AM  -  9:00 AM
    Registration & Networking Coffee
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    Sessions

    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Panel Session: Information Warfare
    Grand Ballroom
    This panel explores how the military should organize, strategize and integrate technology from a variety of military and academic experts working within the information warfare and social technical fields. Representatives from government/military, industry, and academia will describe the current information threats facing our military. The panel will explore the direction they see future social technologies trending toward. Panelist will close by providing their foresight on how the military should organize, strategize, and integrate future technologies to meet the challenges face in this era of great power competition.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Panel Session: Data and Sovereignty
    Salon H
    What does State practice reveal about sovereignty in cyberspace? This is a deeply contested topic, particularly given the mismatch between territorial borders and the ways States seek to protect or assert their interests online. Election interference via information warfare campaigns, efforts to access data across borders for law enforcement and other governmental purposes, and cross-border conflicts over online speech all highlight the ways in which sovereign interests are delinked from the location of the 0s and 1s that affect those interests—with profound implications for national security, individual privacy, security, and freedom of expression. For better or worse, nations are increasingly reaching or attempting to control data outside their borders, sometimes to protect citizens and residents inside their own borders and sometimes to gain a strategic advantage. This dynamic raises key challenges to conventional understanding of the sovereign-territorial link, the meaning of sovereignty under international law, and the scope of permissible actions that can be taken to protect sovereign interests online. This panel will assess these issues, looking at the ways in which States assert their interests across borders in cyberspace, the ways in which these actions threaten sovereign interests, the nature of permitted responses, and broader questions about State practice in cyberspace and sovereignty under international law.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    9:00 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Paper Session 3
    Alexandria Room
    Papers will be presented by the following authors:
    • Alan Mears and Joe Mariani, "The temporal dimension of 'defending forward'"
    • Seth Hamman, "Deciphering Cyber Operations"
     Optional 
     

    Break

    10:30 AM  -  11:00 AM
    Networking Break
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    Sessions

    11:00 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Panel Session: International Legal Implications of Deception in Cyberspace
    Grand Ballroom
    Cyber planners and technicians devote enormous attention and resources to masking the source, intentions and effects of their operations. Yet the international legal implications of cyber deception have received comparatively sparse attention. This panel will offer and debate evaluations of deceptive State and non-State cyber operations under a broad range of legal regimes applicable in both peacetime and in armed conflict. Discussion will consider the extent to which legal analysis of cyber deception requires operational, contextual, and effects-based factual distinctions about operations themselves. What information about the nature, intention, or effects of a cyber operation is relevant to legal analysis? Is all cyber deception legally equivalent? Are cyber dissimulations (obscuring or withholding information) equivalent to cyber simulations (offering incorrect or false information)? Should legal analyses distinguish deception by omission from deception by commission? What, if any, duties do States as authors of cyber deception owe one another with respect to attribution? These and other legal questions related to cyber deception will provide a productive and provocative foundation for further work on this fascinating subject.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Panel Session: Solarium Commission
    Salon H
    The U.S. Cyberspace Solarium Commission (CSC) is a bicameral, bipartisan, intergovernmental body created by the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act to develop a strategic approach to defending the United States in cyberspace against cyberattacks of significant consequence. In spring 2020, the Commission will issue a public report detailing a comprehensive strategic approach with specific policy recommendations for implementation. CSCis studying strategies to defend against the Nation in cyberspace, including strategic approaches that emphasize deterrence, norms-based regimes, and active disruption of adversary attacks. In particular, the Commission is working to identify, assess, and make recommendations to improve the interagency and public-private partnerships essential to protecting our national security critical infrastructure, innovation base, and political system.
    Moderators:
     Optional 
    11:00 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Paper Session 4
    Alexandria Room
    Papers will be presented by the following authors:
    • Forrest Hare, "Noisy Operations on the Silent Battlefield"
    • Simo Huopio, "A Quest for Indicators of Security Debt"
    • David "Ty" Long, "The Cyberspace Operations Wargaming and Education Gap"
     Optional 
     

    Meals

    12:30 PM  -  1:30 PM
    Conference Lunch
    Grand Foyer A-C
    Included conference buffet lunch
     

    Keynote

    1:30 PM  -  2:45 PM
    Keynote Address: A Fireside chat with Chris Inglis and Jeff Kosseff
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
     

    Break

    2:45 PM  -  3:15 PM
    Networking Break
    Grand Foyer A-C
     

    Keynote

    3:15 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Keynote Address: SGM Denver Dill
    Grand Ballroom
    Music and the Strategic National Narrative - Sergeant Major Denver Dill, the Army Music Analytics Team Leader and Analyst for the West Point Music Research Center, will present a surprising look into how music has been an essential component in communicating the United States’ strategic national narrative. From George Washington and Louis Armstrong, to Metallica and Microsoft, music and sound remain essential to our national cultural and commercial identities.
    Keynote Speaker:
    3:30 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Keynote Address: A Fireside chat with Commissioner Starks and Stephanie Pell
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
    4:00 PM  -  4:30 PM
    Keynote Address Ambassador Timo Koster
    Grand Ballroom
    Keynote Speaker:
    4:30 PM  -  4:45 PM
    Closing Remarks
    Grand Ballroom
    Hosts:
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